Day 5: Overdue #1: Nigerian books

THIS PROJECT IS HOSTED BY SEALEA FROM THAT BOOKSHELF BITCH ( THE GORGEOUS HEADER WAS ALSO PROVIDED BY HER)

If you have seen my  list for Nigerian books coming out in 2019   you’ll know that by Jah’s grace next year i will be drenching myself in Nigerian Literature. That said i should have read this books a long time ago. I shall  read them soon ( if i don’t get distracted by shiny new books). 

P.s: The books Below are already published so feel free to get them

Must read:

  • Lives of Great men By Chike Frankie Edozien ( I met him yesterday he was so lovely, and Frankie would want you to know that it won the Lambda literary award).

From Victoria Island, Lagos to Brooklyn, U.S.A. to Accra, Ghana to Paris, France; from across the Diaspora to the heart of the African continent, in this memoir Nigerian journalist Chike Frankie Edozien offers a highly personal series of contemporary snapshots of same gender loving Africans, unsung Great Men living their lives, triumphing and finding joy in the face of great adversity. On his travels and sojourns Edozien explores the worsening legal climate for gay men and women on the continent; the impact homophobic evangelical American pastors are having in many countries, and its toxic intersection with political populism; and experiences the pressures placed on those living under harshly oppressive laws that are themselves the legacy of colonial rule – pressures that sometimes lead to seeking asylum in the West. Yet he remains hopeful, and this memoir, which is pacy, romantic and funny by turns, is also a love-letter to Africa, above all to Nigeria and the megalopolis that is Lagos

  • She called me woman by Azeenarh Mohammed, Chitra Nagarajan , Rafeeat Aliyu (non-fiction)

This stirring and intimate collection brings together 30 captivating narratives to paint a vivid portrait of what it means to be a queer Nigerian woman. Covering an array of experiences – the joy and excitement of first love, the agony of lost love and betrayal, the sometimes-fraught relationship between sexuality and spirituality, addiction and suicide, childhood games and laughter – She Called Me Woman sheds light on how Nigerian queer women, despite their differences, attempt to build a life together in a climate of fear.
Through first-hand accounts, She Called Me Woman challenges us to rethink what it means to be a Nigerian ‘woman’, negotiating relationships, money, sexuality and freedom, identifying outside the gender binary, and the difficulties of achieving hopes and dreams under the constraints of societal expectations and legal terrorism. 
These beautifully told stories of resistance and resilience reveal the realities of a community that refuses to be invisible any longer

  • Passport of mallam Ila by cyprian ekwensi

An story based on the consequences of revenge.

  • Dear Ijewale by Chimananda Adieche

A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s letter of response.
Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions–compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive–for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can “allow” women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today

  • Half of a yellow sun by Chimananda Adieche ( every Nigerian person reading this is shaking their head at me right now!! I’m sorry)

With astonishing empathy and the effortless grace of a natural storyteller, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie weaves together the lives of three characters swept up in the turbulence of the decade. Thirteen-year-old Ugwu is employed as a houseboy for a university professor full of revolutionary zeal. Olanna is the professor’s beautiful mistress, who has abandoned her life of privilege in Lagos for a dusty university town and the charisma of her new lover. And Richard is a shy young Englishman in thrall to Olanna’s twin sister, an enigmatic figure who refuses to belong to anyone. As Nigerian troops advance and the three must run for their lives, their ideals are severely tested, as are their loyalties to one another.

I would try to read this within the first quarter as i already have some of them. Which ones look good enough to you to add to your TBR list? tell me down in the xomments below. 

’till next time

As always,

Booked unicorn

 

 

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